Vegetable “ceviche” salad with fresh cranberry beans

ceviche saladI made this last night, both as dinner for a dear friend who is visiting for the weekend and as a test for the dinner party I’m hosting next weekend. Which I’m both excited and terribly nervous about. Because, as I realized yesterday, this will be my first solo dinner party since I was in my twenties. Which means there’s no one to help clean or entertain people while I’m cooking. For all his flaws, my ex-husband was a perfect dinner party co-host. And while I seemed to have no problem hosting large, elaborate dinner parties on my own before I hooked up with him, I’ve changed since then. I’m now keenly aware of stress and anxiety, working to feel my way through whatever comes up instead of hiding in drugs and alcohol, distracting myself from what’s actually happening in my body. Which is a lot. But I also have yoga now. I try to meditate. I have tools to deal with anxiety. So even though part of me is scared about this first dinner party on my own as this person I’ve become, I know everything is going to be okay. Maybe not perfect, but fun. And when I woke up this morning I felt a million times better knowing that after weeks of uncertainty about what I want to make I’ve started to finalize the menu. Which will most definitely include this salad. Because it’s SO GOOD!!! Also beautiful and summery and easy and can be made in the morning for eating at night. Plus it features one of my favorite parts of summer: fresh cranberry beans.

Admittedly, the original recipe (from Food & Wine) doesn’t call for cranberry beans. Instead it’s more of a riff on succotash, with fresh lima beans. But the cranberry beans were delicious. So, if you find yourself drawn to huge piles of these beauties at your local market, I definitely fresh cranberry beansrecommend this salad is a great way to use them up. (In case you wind up with more beans than the few needed for this salad, here are some other ideas for fresh cranberry beans.) That said, I think any shelling bean will work equally well. And the same is true for other ingredients. For example, I used plums instead of nectarines, because the plums were ripe and the nectarines weren’t. And instead of a jalapeno pepper, I used a pepper from my garden. Because I had a pepper in my garden. Finally, in my riskiest departure, I used Romanesco cauliflower instead of avocado. That one was because when I was at the Farmer’s Market on Thursday, the tiny head of green cauliflower was so gorgeous that I had to get it. Then, because it was so pretty, I had to add it to the salad. Which, happily, turned out to be a very good idea.

Here’s the recipe, which reputedly serves eight. I would say that depends on what else you’re serving. If this is a true side or starter, it’s probably enough for ten. But you could also add some greens (as my visiting friend suggested, it would be good over chopped kale) and make it the main course, in which case I think four people would be very happy with their servings. Now. Recipe. For real.

1 c. fresh cranberry beans (from about 1-1/2 pounds in their pods)
1 t finely grated lime zest
1/3 c. fresh lime juice
1/4 c. extra-virgin olive oil
1 shallot, thinly sliced
1 hot pepper, jalapeno or other
Sea salt
1-1/2 c. fresh corn kernels (from two ears)
1 plums or nectarines or other stone fruit, not too ripe, halved and thinly sliced into wedges
1 small head of Romanesco cauliflower, cut into bite-sized florets
1 pint heirloom cherry tomatoes, halved (a mix of types and colors is nice)
1/2 c. coarsely chopped cilantro

Combine the lime zest, lime juice, olive oil, shallot, and pepper in a large bowl. Whisk to combine then season with salt. Bring two or three cups of water to a boil. Add about a teaspoon of salt and the beans. Cook for 17 minutes, then add the cauliflower. Cook for another three minutes then drain and rinse with cold water. Add to the dressing. Fold in all of the remaining ingredients except the cilantro. Cover and chill for at least two and up to eight hours. Just before serving, toss in the cilantro. Taste and add more salt if necessary. I used quite a bit.

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Herbed Mediterranean frittata, adapted from “The Medicinal Chef”

It’s Sunday morning. Which is, traditionally, supposed to be the very epitome of leisure. But I’m about to go to work. Because, well, just because. Too many uninteresting reasons to spend time writing about here, now, when what I want to do is tell you about this delicious, easy, beautiful, and nourishing frittata.

fritatta

Today is, I think, the third time I’ve made it. Because, like every other recipe I’ve tried from Dale Pinnock’s The Medicinal Chef, this frittata is terrific. But today differs from the other times because today I added beans. Yup. Cannellini beans. On a whim. Because I had some left after my most recent batch of cassoulet.  And it was so good that I decided to share the recipe, which differs from the original only in the addition of yogurt, beans, and feta cheese, which I also happened to have in the fridge, and a few details about how to cut the onions. Some people buy shoes. I buy groceries.  Then stress about how to cook and eat everything before it goes bad. Sigh. This morning, when I was cooking, it occurred to me that I probably should have had children. Or maybe I should live in a commune. But, well, I really like living alone. So I guess I’ll just keep on as I am. It will work out. Okay. Now. Here’s the recipe.

 

Herbed Mediterranean fritatta (serves 4, or 1 with leftovers)

1 t. olive oil
15-16 cherry tomatoes (fewer if yours are large — mine are tiny!)
1/2 red onion, sliced into 1/2 – 3/4″ wedges
10-12 pitted black Kalamata olives
1/4 c. cooked cannellini beans, rinsed and drained (optional — canned are fine)
6 large, free-range eggs
2 T. full-fat yogurt
2 T. feta cheese, crumbled (optional)
salt and pepper
1/4 c. fresh Italian parsley, minced
1/4 c. fresh basil, minced
1/4 c. fresh spearmint, minced

Preheat the oven to 400. Heat the olive oil in a medium sized skillet over medium-high heat. Saute the onions for a couple of minutes, reduce the heat to medium, add the tomatoes and garlic, and saute for another 2 or 3 minutes. Add the olives.

Whisk the eggs and yogurt together in a medium-sized bowl, season moderately with salt and pepper (the olives and feta cheese are both pretty salty, so you don’t want to overdo it), then add the herbs. Pour the egg mixture into the skillet.  Move the tomatoes and olives around so you don’t have a clump of one ingredient. Add the beans and cheese, if using, to fill in the blanks.

Reduce the heat to low and continue cooking on the stove for another 5 minutes, then transfer to the oven. Cook for 10-20 minutes, until the top has puffed but before it browns. Remove from the oven and let stand for a few minutes. Transfer to a plate or serve directly from the skillet.