Buckwheat waffles with pecans

Once again, I’m posting a non-bean recipe. Apparently this is a new trend. Which I’m justifying because it fits  my overall approach to cooking and eating delicious food that makes me feel good both during and after the meal. Plus it’s Christmas, and the friends I usually celebrate with are out of town.  This year, it’s just me and my mom. So I decided against an elaborate holiday meal. A big dinner, normally something I adore doing, just seemed like too much for two people. But I wanted to do something special to mark the occasion. After considerable thought, I settled on overnight waffles.

Everyday waffles, the kind that, provided you have a waffle iron, come together in a half hour or so, are perfectly great. But overnight waffles, which require yeast and forethought and which I’d never made before today, seemed sufficiently festive to qualify for a holiday breakfast. I got the idea from the “Make-Ahead Breakfasts for a Crowd” article in the December 2013 issue of Fine Cooking.

Although the original waffle recipe sounded wonderful, I decided to substitute pecans for the bacon. I am in the enviable position of having several pounds of fresh pecans, which my mother brought up with her from Florida. I’ve had pecan waffles once before, in Atlanta. And they were out of this world good. So that was an obvious choice. But, while I didn’t have bacon, I did have bacon fat in the fridge from two weeks ago, when I made deviled eggs for a friend’s holiday party. Accordingly, while these waffles do not have any actual meat, they are decidedly not vegetarian. However, I did not really taste the bacon. So I don’t think you would lose anything by leaving it out and making these with butter.

If you’re in the mood to experiment, I also think you could easily make these gluten-free by subbing a combination of gluten-free flours for the whole wheat, perhaps brown rice flour, tapioca flour, oat flour, or potato starch. Or something else. Check out this post from glutenfreegirl. (http://bit.ly/1c5TlKs) If you do experiment, please let me know how it turns out. I will do the same.

This blog post is the second of two recipes I’ve adapted from that article in the past couple of months. The first was overnight granola, a version of which I made and blogged about during the Thanksgiving holiday. (http://bit.ly/1bqqJrM) And here’s a link to the original recipe for buckwheat-bacon waffles on which this current post is based. (http://bit.ly/K5vPnH)

As with my version of Fine Cooking’s granola, in making these waffles I took liberties with ingredients but followed the method of the original recipe. And, like the granola, this was a great success.buckwheat wafflesUnlike the granola, I probably won’t make these on a regular basis. But, because I’m not cooking for a crowd this year, I was able to fill a large freezer bag with waffles that I’ll be able to grab on-the-go over the next few days. Which is super exciting. Because, as I learned this morning both by reading about the nutritional profile of buckwheat and by how I felt after eating several waffles (energized and satiated, without any sugar craving), they’re actually quite nourishing. If you’re curious, here’s a link with more information about the wonders of buckwheat. (http://bit.ly/1ihIQsg) Here’s my adapted version of the recipe.

2 T. rendered bacon fat
6 T. butter
2 cups whole or low-fat milk (I used 2%)
1-1/4 cups buckwheat flour
3/4 cups white whole wheat flour
1-1/2 t. yeast
1/2 t. table salt
2 large eggs
1 T. pure maple syrup, plus more for serving
1 t. pure vanilla extract
1 c. pecans, chopped

THE NIGHT BEFORE
Put the bacon fat and butter in a 2 or 3-quart saucepan and heat over low heat until both are melted. Add the milk and heat for another 2 or 3 minutes, until it’s just warmed through. While it’s heating, whisk the flours, yeast, and salt together in a large bowl that will accommodate at least 3 quarts. The batter will double in volume. Slowly whisk in the warm milk, continuing to whisk until the batter is smooth.

In a small bowl, whisk the eggs, maple syrup, and vanilla. Scrape the mixture into the batter and whisk just until incorporated. Cover the bowl and refrigerate for 9 – 23 hours.

IN THE MORNING
Remove the bowl from the fridge about an hour before you plan to start making the waffles, to let the batter rise a bit more. (This is not in the original recipe, but I found that the batter had not really risen very much. I think it’s because I used regular yeast, not rapid-rise.  (If you used rapid-rise yeast, skip this step and let the bowl stay in the fridge an extra hour.) Heat a waffle iron. Gently fold the pecans into the batter, which will deflate to about 4 cups. Ladle the batter into the waffle iron in accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions (or your experience), and cook until crisp and lightly browned. Serve with maple syrup.

If you have leftovers, I encourage you to freeze them for later. Just like the waffles you see in the freezer section at the grocery store, but better!

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